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How do the Jennis HIIT Run sessions actually work?

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Want to try an Outdoor Body Blast from the Jennis programme? Then why not get Jess Ennis-Hill coaching you one-to-one with the Jennis HIIT Run sessions – available on SoundCloud and YouTube

 

Fancy adding an outdoor session to your Jennis programme? Want something that keeps it interesting while boosting your fitness? And how about getting Jess coaching you through the whole session for extra motivation? Then you need to try the Jennis HIIT Run sessions – available on SoundCloud and YouTube.

 

What’s a Jennis HIIT Run session anyway?

It’s a type of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that involves short bursts of intense exercise performed at speed, followed by a slower rest period in one workout. Sprint HIITs have played a key part in Jess’ training schedule, and she and her coach Toni have tailored the session to suit you. There are Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced sessions, and you don’t need any equipment or a timer, as Jess will talk you through when you need to run and when to reduce your pace.

 

How do Jennis HIIT Runs help you get fitter?

All exercise activates biological reactions that can help you get fitter and improve your cell health. However, the more intense workouts involved in HIIT workouts – which include HIIT Runs – fast-track these reactions, so you improve your fitness in less time.

 

It’s been shown that in high-intensity workouts, your body can’t supply blood and oxygen fast enough to the muscles so it must rely on its anaerobic system for energy – this taps into glucose available for energy in the muscles. Then during the rest periods, the body switches back to its aerobic system, which releases fat stores for energy. Eventually, your body relies less on the anaerobic system, improving efficiency all round.

 

The rest periods are a vital part of the workout, giving your body time to recover for the next high-intensity burst of exercise. They also help your heart to adapt between the sprint and recovery periods, so it becomes more efficient at transporting oxygen around the body. 
 

And it works – a 2019 study in Journal of Sports Sciences found that when a group of women did three weekly sessions of sprint interval training for 12 weeks, their cardiorespiratory fitness improved and they lost weight when compared to the group doing normal, steady-state cardio exercise.

 

You don’t need any equipment or a timer, as Jess will talk you through when you need to run and when you need to reduce your pace

How fast do you run in a Jennis HIIT Run session?

Jennis HIIT Runs feature alternating hard runs and recovery runs, but when it comes to the hard runs, you shouldn’t go full gas as you will burn out too quickly. Instead, aim for 70 per cent of your maximum effort, so that you definitely get your heart rate up but you don’t go so hard that you have nothing left. This is particularly important for the 60, 50, 40 and 30-second run efforts.

 

It’s only during the final runs of 20 seconds and 10 seconds that you should really push yourself to 100 per cent effort. These are proper sprints – so leg it as fast as you can. If you can speak during one of these, you need to go faster…

 

The Jennis HIIT Run sessions in detail

BEGINNER

Total time = 18 minutes

3 x sets, with a longer 3-minute rest in between

 

2-minute warm up

Set 1 (2 minutes 40 seconds)
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 2 (2 minutes 40 seconds)
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 3 (2 minutes 40 seconds)
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

2-minute recovery rest

 

INTERMEDIATE

Total time = 22 mins 30

3 x sets, with a longer 3-minute rest in between

 

2-minute warm-up

Set 1 (4 minutes 10 seconds long)
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 2 (4 minutes 10 seconds long)
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 3 (4 minutes 10 seconds long)
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

2-minute recovery rest

 

It’s only during the final runs of 20 seconds and 10 seconds in length that you should really push yourself to 100 per cent effort. These are proper sprints – so leg it as fast as you can!

ADVANCED

Total time = 28 minutes

3 x sets, with a longer 3-minute rest in between

 

2-minute warm-up

Set 1 (6 minutes long)
- 60-second run
- 50-second rest
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 2 (6 minutes long)
- 60-second run
- 50-second rest
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

3-minute rest

 

Set 3 (6 minutes long)
- 60-second run
- 50-second rest
- 50-second run
- 40-second rest
- 40-second run
- 30-second rest
- 30-second run
- 20-second rest
- 20-second sprint
- 10-second rest
- 10-second sprint

2-minute recovery rest

 

Can you walk in the rest periods?

In an ideal world, you’d jog gently through your rest periods to make it more of a workout. But if you’re really struggling and need a break, walking is good, too. A 2014 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness reported that active rest – which includes walking as well as jogging – is more effective at clearing lactate, a waste produced during intense exercise, from the blood.

 

After your workout

It might sound silly but just as you would with an indoor workout, it’s important to take the time to cool down and stretch after a short hill repeat. Lacking in inspo? Check out Jennis Fitness Extras on the app for Jess’ cool-down moves.

Find out more about the Outdoor Body Blasts

Find out more about the Jennis Fitness programme

 

Listen to Jess' HIIT Run coaching sessions on SoundCloud 

Listen to Jess' HIIT Run coaching sessions on YouTube

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